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Posts Tagged ‘NCIC’

Why did it take until Tuesday afternoon to enter Brittanee Drexel as a missing child at the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC)? Shouldn’t she have been entered into the NCMEC database once she was entered into the FBI National Crime Information Center (NCIC) computers? It would seem it would have been the ideal time to obtain a waiver from her parent or guardian, so it was on file at the NCMEC giving them permission to disseminate her photograph, if that is the reason for the delay.

According to SCNow.com:  

Police entered Drexel’s description into the National Crime Information Center database on Sunday.

 

On the NCMEC site they have tips of what to do should your child “runaway”. Some of them are:

Make sure law enforcement enters your child’s name and description into the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI) National Crime Information Center’s (NCIC) databases. Law-enforcement agencies across the country have access to NCIC. This information will not give your child a record with law enforcement, but it may aid in his or her safe return.
If your local law-enforcement agency won’t enter information about your child into NCIC’s databases, the FBI will. The Missing Children Act of 1982 mandates this. Contact your nearest FBI field office for help.

If your local law-enforcement agency won’t enter information about your child into NCIC’s databases, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) will. The Missing Children Act of 1982 mandates this. Contact your nearest FBI field office for help.

Remember no matter what you have been told, there is no law requiring a waiting period for reporting a child, who is younger than 21, to law enforcement or for entry into NCIC. The Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Pub. L. No. 109-248) mandates entry must be made by law enforcement into NCIC’s Missing Person File within 2 hours’ receipt of a report of a missing or abducted child.

Make sure that law enforcement passes on the necessary information about your child to the missing-child clearinghouse within your state or territory.

If you have not done so,report your missing child to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) at 1-800-THE-LOST (1-800-843-5678). Staff members are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to assist. Ask about other missing-child organizations throughout the United States that may assist in the search.

Searching for updates on another missing teen, Kara Kopetsky  is listed at the NCMEC as Endangered Missing. She has been missing since May 4, 2007.

Teen argued with teacher, left school and vanished

When Kara didn’t come home from school as usual, her family — mother Rhonda, stepfather Jim and stepbrother Thomas — grew worried. They filed a missing persons report later that afternoon.
Police told them they believed Kara was a runaway, and that she’d come back on her own in a few days.

Other children  last seen walking to or from school are Mark Degner and Bryan Hayes  last seen in Jacksonville, Fl. on Feb 10, 2005 and Amber Dubois  last seen on Feb 13, 2009.

Update 05-05-09: When hearing of a Texas based non-profit group in Myrtle Beach to help in the search for Brittanee you may think it is Texas Equusearch who recently helped search for Caylee Anthony in Florida but you would be mistaken as there are members of another Texas based group the Laura Recovery Center for Missing Children.

“We’re still looking for her,” Knipes said. “She could be a runaway, a missing person or an abduction. We don’t have a label on it.”

Also Monday, two representatives from the Laura Recovery Center for Missing Children arrived in Myrtle Beach to assist in the search, according to Bob Walcutt, executive director. The Texas-based group’s mission statement is to “prevent abductions and runaways and to recover missing children by fostering a Triangle of Trust among law enforcement, community and a missing child’s family.”

Update 05-06-09: Crime Stoppers offers reward up to $1000 in Brittanee Drexel disappearance


The public is encouraged to contact Crime Stoppers if they, or someone they know, have any information regarding the disappearance of Brittanee Drexel, or of any other crimes, by phone at 1-888-274-6372 (1-888-CRIME-SC), or on the web at http://www.5541111.com. Anonymous text tips can be sent to Crimes Stoppers by starting a new text message to CRIMES (274637), and mark the beginning of the message with “CSL”. All contact remains anonymous and tipsters could earn a reward up to $1000.

Update 05-09-09: N.Y. pastor offers additional $10,000 for info on missing teen

An Albany, N.Y., pastor has offered to pitch in $10,000 of his own money to up the reward for information regarding Brittanee Drexel, a missing 17-year-old from Rochester, N.Y.

Pastor Charles Muller of Victory Christian Church said he regularly works with teens in his community through mission centers and anti-violence projects. However, when he read about Drexel, who went missing April 25 during a trip to Myrtle Beach, it hit close to home.

Update 05-14-09: Police Investigate Possible Sighting of Missing New York Teen Who Vanished in Myrtle Beach

Police are investigating a possible sighting at a gas station of missing New York teen Brittanee Drexel, who disappeared while on spring break in Myrtle Beach.

Myrtle Beach Capt. David Knipes said detectives are reviewing surveillance camera footage from a Scotchman convenience store at a gas station in Socastee, S.C., after a woman fitting 17-year-old Drexel’s description was reported to have been there Thursday morning.

The Brittanee look-alike used the ATM about 8:30 a.m. Thursday, left the station’s store and then drove away in a red Dodge Stratus with New York license plates, Knipes said.

The vehicle’s plate number is EJS-9543.

Update 05-15-09: Police Determine Look-Alike Is Not Missing New York Teen Who Vanished in Myrtle Beach

Update 06-03-09: Brittanee Drexel Update

In five weeks of searching, there has been no sign of Brittanee Drexel. There have been dozens of leads and sightings. None have panned out.

Brittanee’s mother, Dawn Drexel, has been in South Carolina since the beginning. She is determined as ever, but she told News 10NBC by phone Wednesday she’s emotionally spent.

“This is very, very difficult because you don’t know, you just don’t know if she’s still here with us…or she’s not….But we’re trying to keep hopeful that we can find her still,” Drexel said.

Drexel has traveled to Charleston and points in between, talking to people, handing out flyers. This weekend, Brittanee’s story will air on “America’s Most Wanted.” That gives Dawn Drexel hope.

“I’m trying to get her on national television and keep her face out there so if somebody did see something or heard something, that they would come forward.”

Related Post:

Rochester girl missing in Myrtle Beach

Missing 14-year-old Escondido girl

Endangered and Missing ages 12-13

Holding out hope

$50,000 reward for Kara Kopetsky soon to end

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The National Crime Information Center’s (NCIC) Missing Person File was implemented in 1975. Records in the Missing Person File are retained indefinitely, until the individual is located or the record is canceled by the entering agency.

The National Child Search Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5779, 5780) requires law enforcement to immediately enter into the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) database every reported case involving a missing child. The intent of this law is to ensure that law enforcement disseminates as quickly as possible information vital to the recovery of a missing child. The steps for entering a child abduction into NCIC are critical:

Enter the information immediately—with NO delay. Law enforcement should enter a child into NCIC immediately without delay. The initial entry should be reviewed within one hour of entry into NCIC and verified as to the entry time, accuracy of the descriptive information of the victim and/or perpetrator, vehicle used in the abduction, and other information that could help law enforcement apprehend the perpetrator. (Information about the perpetrator should also be entered in the Wanted Person File if a warrant is issued, and the records should be linked.) Unfortunately, in some cases data about an abducted child was not entered into NCIC until hours and even days after the child’s disappearance. Such delays can have disastrous consequences.

Use the proper NCIC category. Child abduction cases should be entered into the NCIC Missing Person File in either the endangered or the involuntary category, and the child abduction (CA) flag should be entered. An NCIC number will be automatically assigned when the record is entered. The reporting agency should assign a case or originating agency case (OCA) number to the preliminary or initial investigation. Each entry of a child age 17 or under should be reviewed to ensure that the information has been entered into the appropriate category. NCIC will then send an immediate notification to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC). NCMEC call center staff will get in contact with the appropriate law enforcement agency to conduct the intake of the case and offer all available resources. The designated supervisor should also audit each entry within one hour of the initial entry to verify and authenticate each record, signature, and time.

NCIC MISSING PERSON FILE CATEGORY/AGE/SEX/RACE 2007

 

UNDER 18

18 AND OLDER

ALL AGES

TOTAL

643,744

171,213

814,957

 
JUVENILE

617,939

8,697

626,636

ENDANGERED

14,206

79,885

79,885

INVOLUNTARY

6,165

15,582

21,747

DISABILITY

3,439

30,964

34,403

CATASTROPHE

90

245

335

OTHER

1,906

35,840

37,746

 
FEMALE

366,205

73,531

439,736

MALE

277,530

97,679

375,209

UNKNOWN

9

3

12

 
ASIAN

9,653

4,405

14,058

BLACK

216,759

44,314

261,073

INDIAN

8,417

1,590

10,007

UNKNOWN

13,392

4,696

18,088

WHITE *

395,523

116,208

511,731

* Includes Hispanic

 Source: NCIC Active/Expired Missing and Unidentified Analysis Reports

 

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In 2006, Congress passed the “Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Protection Act of 2006″ partly due to the lack of a National sex offender registry.

In this article, from the Berkshire Eagle  there is a National registry for missing children but apparently not all States track them.

On-line database for missing kids

Tool would help state officials track youth 

 

The article points out that the issues are two-fold.

  • Lack of tracking over children over 18 and less than 21 years of age
  • Failure by Police to enter information into the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC)

    The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children’s® (NCMEC) mission is to help prevent child abduction and sexual exploitation; help find missing children; and assist victims of child abduction and sexual exploitation, their families, and the professionals who serve them.

  • Serves as a clearinghouse of information about missing and exploited children
  • The National Child Search Assistance Act of 1990 requires each federal, state, and local law-enforcement agency to enter information about missing children younger than the age of 18 into the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI) National Crime Information Center (NCIC) database. The Act also establishes state reporting requirements.

    C. Missing Persons:

      1.  A person of any age who is missing and who is under proven physical/mental disability or is senile, thereby subjecting that person or others to personal and immediate danger.
      2.  A person of any age who is missing under circumstances indicating that the disappearance was not voluntary.
      3.  A person of any age who is missing under circumstances indicating that that person’s physical safety may be in danger.
      4. A person of any age who is missing after a catastrophe. 
      5. A person who is missing and declared unemancipated as defined by the laws of the person’s state of residence and does not meet any of the entry criteria set forth in 1-4 above.

    Why should States need to maintain seperate databases? The NCMEC has a federally funded operating budget from the DOJ of approximately $40 million annually and Police are required by law to enter the information. If Police won’t or don’t enter missing children in a National database, why would you expect them to enter it in a Statewide one? Search most States websites (who have a Missing Children’s Clearinghouse) and they typically link to the NCMEC for missing children listings. For instance, from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) site:

    In response to the concern for missing children in Florida,the 1982 Florida Legislature appropriated funds to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement for the establishment of the first state Missing Children Information Clearinghouse (MCIC) in the nation.The program provides liaison among citizens, private organizations and law enforcement officials regarding missing children information.

    To see any missing children you have to click on the link to the NCMEC.

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